Sourdough Starter

Total Time: 3-6 days + weekly maintenance

Tools:

  • Permanent container for a sourdough. I recommend something that is taller so that when the starter ferments and rises, it doesn’t overflow
  • Stirring utensil
  • Plastic wrap

Ingredients:

  • start with 1c whole wheat flour
  • start with 2/3c water (if it is cold in your house, add lukewarm water, if it is warm in your house, add cool water)
  • All purpose flour and water for Day 2-6

Directions:

DAY 1: Combine flour and water and cover loosely in plastic wrap for 24 hours in an apprx 70 degree F area.

DAY 2: After 24 hours, discard 1/2 the starter and add 1/2 c all purpose flour + 1/4c water. Texture should be like pancake batter but a little bit thicker. If not, add a little more water. Mix and let rest @ room temp for 24 hours.

DAY 3: 12 hour feeds start. For each feeding, take out half the starter and add 1/c all purpose flour and 1/4c water. Discard half the starter OR bake with it! Do every 12 hours. If your starter is already super bubbly, you can stop here , and then on DAY 4, move on to the steps of DAY 5

DAY 4: 12 hour feeds continue. Repeat Day 3.

DAY 5: Should be bubbly and doubled in volume. If not, do Day 3 and 4 over again. If ready, discard 1/2 starter and add 1/2c all purpose flour and 1/4 c water. Let it rest for 6-8 hours. Should be active w/ bubbles breaking the surface.

DAY 6: Remove however much starter you need (for my recipe, 125g) and transfer remaining into permanent container (if not already done). Feed and let rest at room temp for several hours. Refrigerate.

Now, feed WEEKLY 1/2c all purpose flour and 1/4c water. Texture should be like pancake batter but a little bit thicker. If not, add a little more water.

In the end, it should look like this:

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Where should I buy these ingredients?

We get our whole wheat flour locally from Carolina Ground Flour in Asheville, NC. Our all-purpose is either the King Arthur’s brand or Trader Joe’s.

If you want to try good sourdough first, I recommend finding a highly rated French bakery near you and tasting their bread and ask where they source their flour from.

 

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